Community Agreements Protocol

List of common lists of couples or trios. Ask these groups to agree on their top 1-3 chords in order of priority, and rewrite each in a single sentence or sentence. You probably need to model this. Developing community agreements is a powerful strategy for grouping a group into a single team. The process of building agreements is often more important than the product. Agreements are the result of a consensual process to identify what each person in the group needs each other and mutually commits to feeling safe, supported, open and confident. As such, they provide a common framework for how people want to work together and be together when taking transformative action. Here are some tips for developing community agreements. We have found that most of the time, in the rooms we allow, when someone does or says something that causes damage or supports the values of oppressive systems, it is not their intention to do so. But if we use our good intentions to deny (or avoid) the damage of being responsible for it), there will be more damage.

The demand of this Community agreement is that we all do the work to recognise that our intention and the impact of our actions are two different things and to take responsibility for any negative effects we have. (This can be as simple as an apology.) In relational community agreements, it`s about how we want to relate to each other (for example. B tell your truth, be present). Things like community agreements, an agenda, a diagram of your group`s available decision-making, and a place where important topics can be stored for future conversations, next steps, etc., are important foundations for a meeting – we call it a « container. » They serve as visual tools that participants and facilitators can rely on throughout the meeting to focus the group, circulate and stay on the same page. They also offer direction for those times when things get sticky or tense. U-M teachers use policies like this to promote an atmosphere of mutual respect and collaborative study in their classes. Sometimes also referred to as « ground rules, » community agreements, or participation standards (and there are several more detailed examples below), these guidelines can be provided by a teacher or established in collaboration with students. . . .